Dutch Oven Garlic Rosemary Venison Stew (or Beef or Lamb) with Winter Vegetables and Portobello Mushrooms

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One of my clients spends just about every fall/winter weekend hunting with his buddies, and about two months ago he arrived at my office with a hunk of fresh venison in hand.  It was a lovely gesture from a wonderful man with whom I've been working for three months and making great strides in healing his gut and alleviating the symptoms of Lyme disease.  I appreciated his thoughtfulness immensely, but I had never cooked venison in my life, so I threw it in a glass container and tossed in the freezer for what I thought to be an indefinite period of time.   

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However, as the blizzard warnings began last week, I started thinking about how much my husband (who's as meat and potatoes as it gets), would love a venison stew, so I began to go through my cookbooks and search the Internet for various venison, lamb, and beef recipes to spur my creativity.  After going through about 40-50 different approaches (I'm an ex-analyst, so I always tend to over-research) to meaty stew and going through my cupboards to see what I have on hand that is about to reach its expiration date, I came up with this meal, which, according to my husband, is the best meal I've ever cooked  up (thus far).  

The good news is that it was absolutely delicious.  The venison was so tender and moist that it fell off the fork.  And the sauce was divine, rich and full of flavor.  In fact, we had a good deal of sauce and veggies left over after the vultures in my house ate all the venison, so I just browned some grass-fed beef with some onion and spices and threw it in the pot with the leftovers, which made another delicious meal.  

The bad news is that this recipe is labor and time intensive.  You have to soak the venison for 24 hours (if you're using venison) and the total prep and cooking time is about 3 hours.  As such, it is definitely not an "everyday" kind of meal.  It's a fantastic choice if you are having company or on a special occasion (such as a big snow day), or if you just love to cook.  Whatever the case is, the primary point is that it really is worth it.  

 

Visual Recipe

So let's get down to it.  If you prefer, you can scroll down through the visual part of the recipe all the way down to the bottom, where I have the "quick-and-dirty" recipe written out for you.  This recipe is just as delicious with lamb or beef, but if you're cooking venison, keep in mind that it should be soaked for 24 hours in advance of preparation to remove the "gaminess."  This recipe serves 6-8 hungry people and makes great leftovers if your people are fewer in number or not as hungry.  It takes approximately 3 hours of prep and cooking time.  Leave yourself a little more time if you're making it for the first time and/or you have guests coming over at a certain hour.  

As always, I have included Amazon links to all the products and brands I use and recommend to keep your meal organic, healthy, delicious, and as natural as possible.  These appear in blue throughout this post, so click on them and you can quicky prep them 

 

These are all the ingredients you will need for this recipe minus the portobello mushrooms (which were an afterthought, but truly, one of the best things about this recipe) and the stewed tomatoes which were cooking on the stove at the time (I just got the  organic whole peeled tomatoes in a glass jar  because I couldn't find any at the store that were organic AND did NOT come in a BPA-lined can.  Of course, you can just get regular organic tomatoes and peel them yourself).

These are all the ingredients you will need for this recipe minus the portobello mushrooms (which were an afterthought, but truly, one of the best things about this recipe) and the stewed tomatoes which were cooking on the stove at the time (I just got the organic whole peeled tomatoes in a glass jar because I couldn't find any at the store that were organic AND did NOT come in a BPA-lined can.  Of course, you can just get regular organic tomatoes and peel them yourself).

Ingredients

 

Diretions

1. If you are preparing beef or lamb, skip steps 1 & 2. If you're preparing venison, soak it for 24 hours in advance of cooking in order to make it less "gamey" tasting.  Here' how:  Put it in a deep bowl full of water and 1 tablespoon of white vinegar mixed into it.  If the roast is not fully covered with water, add more.  Cover the bowl with a lid or saran wrap and put it in the refrigerator over night (or for about 12 hours).

2.  After the roast has soaked in the water and vinegar mixture for about 12 hours, dump the liquid, rinse the bowl, and cover the venison with filtered water only.  Replace the lid or saran wrap and put the meat back in the refrigerator for another 12 hours.  (Note: you don't have to be a time Nazi when you're soaking the venison.  If you end up soaking your venison in vinegar for 14 hours and in fresh water for only 8 - or vice versa, that will work too.)

3.  Take the meat (venison, lamb or beef) out of the refrigerator.  If you're making lamb, allow it to sit out at room temperature for 30 minutes before prepping, and if beef, then for 60 minutes before prepping.  If you're making venison, remove the silver skin/sinew and excess fat from the meat.

4.  Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit (or 175 Celsius).

5.  Start the stewed tomatoes If you're making them yourself.  If you are using store bought organic whole peeled tomatoes in a glass jar, skip the first step below:  

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  1. To peel your tomatoes, place them in boiling water for 1 minute, immediately transfer them to cold water, and then peel them. 
  2. Quarter tomatoes and place in a large saucepan with 2 teaspoons of Himalayan or sea salt, 1/2 teaspoon of organic coconut palm sugar (optional), 1 teaspoon organic dried parsley (or 2 teaspoons fresh), 1/2 teaspoon organic onion powder and 1/2 teaspoon organic garlic powder
  3. Slowly simmer over low heat for 20 to 30 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent burning.

6.  Prep, peel and chop all of the ingredients, per the recipe above.  Trust me on this one! It will make it far more efficient for you to prepare this meal.

5.  Get back to your meat and rub your roast all over with several of the crushed cloves of garlic.

5.  Using a long, thin knife begin piercing the roast a couple of inches deep and about 2-3 inches apart.  Use a teaspoon handle to push the rosemary leaves and crushed garlic pieces into the slits.  (Note: It's a little easier if you put the rosemary in first and then the garlic.)

6.  Sprinkle the roast with Coarse Pink Himalayan Salt (or Kosher salt) and pepper.  

7.  Pour some olive oil into the dutch oven and heat it on the stove over high heat and sear the roast until all sides are browned.

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8.  Remove the roast, set aside, and reduce the heat under the pot to medium.

9.  Add another 1-2 tablespoons of olive oil to the pot and saute the carrots, celery, and chopped onion until they brown.

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10.  Add the roast back to pot and pour red wine over it.

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11.  Then add the stewed tomatoes and beef bone broth (or stock) to cover the roast, and bring everything to a boil on the stove top.

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12.  After it boils, cover your pot with the lid and place it in the preheated oven.

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13.  After the roast is in the oven, saute the shallots and parsnips by placing them in a large saute pan and browning them over medium high heat.  Set aside.

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14.  Using the same pan, saute the potatoes, adding a little more Coarse Pink Himalayan Salt (or Kosher salt) and whatever rosemary leaves you have left over, and browning them over medium high heat.  Once they are browned, take them off the heat and add them to the shallots and parsnips you have already set aside.

15.  One hour into cooking the roast, add the remaining vegetables to the pot and replace the lid.  Cook in the oven for an additional 30-60 minutes until the meat is fork tender.

16.  Once the meat is fully cooked, take the pot out of the oven and put in the remaining sliced portobello mushrooms.  Replace the lid and let it sit for about 15 minutes.  

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17.  Serve hot, with a sprig of fresh rosemary on top, and enjoy with a full-bodied bottle of red.  

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Dutch Oven Garlic Rosemary Venison Stew Recipe

Serves 6-8

Ingredients

 

Directions

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1. If you are preparing beef or lamb, skip steps 1 & 2. If you're preparing venison, soak it for 24 hours in advance of cooking in order to make it less "gamey" tasting.  Here' how:  Put it in a deep bowl full of water and 1 tablespoon of white vinegar mixed into it.  If the roast is not fully covered with water, add more.  Cover the bowl with a lid or saran wrap and put it in the refrigerator over night (or for about 12 hours).

2.  After the roast has soaked in the water and vinegar mixture for about 12 hours, dump the liquid, rinse the bowl, and cover the venison with filtered water only.  Replace the lid or saran wrap and put the meat back in the refrigerator for another 12 hours.  (Note: you don't have to be a time Nazi when you're soaking the venison.  If you end up soaking your venison in vinegar for 14 hours and in fresh water for only 8 - or vice versa, that will work too.)

3.  Take the meat (venison, lamb or beef) out of the refrigerator.  If you're making lamb, allow it to sit out at room temperature for 30 minutes before prepping, and if beef, then for 60 minutes before prepping.  If you're making venison, remove the silver skin/sinew and excess fat from the meat.

4.  Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit (or 175 Celsius).

5.  Start the stewed tomatoes If you're making them yourself.  If you are using store bought organic whole peeled tomatoes in a glass jar, skip the first step below:.  

  1. To peel your tomatoes, place them in boiling water for 1 minute, immediately transfer them to cold water, and then peel them. 
  2. Quarter tomatoes and place in a large saucepan with 2 teaspoons of Himalayan or sea salt, 1/2 teaspoon of organic coconut palm sugar (optional), 1 teaspoon organic dried parsley (or 2 teaspoons fresh), 1/2 teaspoon organic onion powder and 1/2 teaspoon organic garlic powder
  3. Slowly simmer over low heat for 20 to 30 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent burning.

6.  Prep, peel and chop all of the ingredients, per the recipe above.  Trust me on this one! It will make it far more efficient for you to prepare this meal.

5.  Get back to your meat and rub your roast all over with several of the crushed cloves of garlic.

5.  Using a long, thin knife begin piercing the roast a couple of inches deep and about 2-3 inches apart.  Use a teaspoon handle to push the rosemary leaves and crushed garlic pieces into the slits.  (Note: It's a little easier if you put the rosemary in first and then the garlic.)

6.  Sprinkle the roast with Coarse Pink Himalayan Salt (or Kosher salt) and pepper.  

7.  Pour some olive oil into the dutch oven and heat it on the stove over high heat and sear the roast until all sides are browned.

8.  Remove the roast, set aside, and reduce the heat under the pot to medium.

9.  Add another 1-2 tablespoons of olive oil to the pot and saute the carrots, celery, and chopped onion until they brown.

10.  Add the roast back to pot and pour red wine over it.

11.  Then add the stewed tomatoes and stock to cover the roast, and bring everything to a boil on the stove top.

12.  After it boils, cover your pot with the lid and place it in the preheated oven.

13.  After the roast is in the oven, saute the shallots and parsnips by placing them in a large saute pan and browning them over medium high heat.  Set aside.

14.  Using the same pan, saute the potatoes, adding a little more Coarse Pink Himalayan Salt (or Kosher salt) and whatever rosemary leaves you have left over, and browning them over medium high heat.  Once they are browned, take them off the heat and add them to the shallots and parsnips you have already set aside.

15.  One hour into cooking the roast, add the remaining vegetables to the pot and replace the lid.  Cook in the oven for an additional 30-60 minutes until the meat is fork tender.

16.  Once the meat is fully cooked, take the pot out of the oven and put in the remaining sliced portobello mushrooms.  Replace the lid and let it sit for about 15 minutes.  

17.  Serve hot, with a sprig of fresh rosemary on top, and enjoy with a full-bodied bottle of red.  


No time to make homemade  bone broth ? Use this  Great Lakes Gelatin  product (which I personally love and use twice daily).  It is made from grass-fed beef bones and provides many of the same benefits as bone broth.  I swear by it to  reduce joint pain and inflammation, strengthen my hair and nails, and even reduce cellulite !

No time to make homemade bone broth? Use this Great Lakes Gelatin product (which I personally love and use twice daily).  It is made from grass-fed beef bones and provides many of the same benefits as bone broth.  I swear by it to reduce joint pain and inflammation, strengthen my hair and nails, and even reduce cellulite!


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